Will endometriosis prevent me getting pregnant?

Endometriosis is the second most common gynaecological condition in the UK affecting around one in 10 women. It is a chronic condition and the symptoms vary, often worsening with the menstrual cycle. Usually affecting women of reproductive age, one of its principal complications is a difficulty in getting pregnant.

What is endometriosis?

The endometrium is the lining of the womb. Endometriosis is a common condition where tissue that behaves like this lining is found elsewhere in the body, most commonly on the ovaries, on the lining of the pelvis and over the top of the vagina. Despite being outside of the womb, the cells of these patches of endometrium react the same way to the monthly cycle as the womb lining: by thickening in preparation for implantation, and then shedding if no fertilisation has occurred. However, with nowhere for this shed tissue to go, the result is often swelling and pain, usually in the lower abdomen or pelvic area. There is no known cure but symptoms are often managed by hormone therapy or medication. Endometriosis can sometimes damage the fallopian tubes or ovaries, thereby impeding a woman’s chances of pregnancy.

Can fertility treatment help?

Endometriosis is a common finding in patients presenting at Miss Amanda Tozer’s London fertility clinic. For women who have visible patches of endometriosis on their reproductive organs, surgery may be able to help. There is good evidence that the removal of these tissues can improve the chances of getting pregnant. During your initial consultation with highly experienced female gynaecologist Miss Tozer, you will discuss your full medical history and will undergo diagnostic tests and a pelvic ultrasound scan. Based in London’s Harley Street, Miss Amanda Tozer is accredited by the RCOG in Obstetric and Gynaecology, Subspecialist in Reproductive Medicine and Minimal Access Surgery, and well respected by her previous fertility patients for her support and attentive care.